OFOAM Archives

Some folks are just happier when they've got a serious case of the blues — that's the way it is for Fabio Barbosa, Jim Derrickson, Gary Tada, and Brad Wheeler, who make up The Rockin' Jukes band.

"Gary likes to play a lot of swing blues and jump blues," said Wheeler. "I like to play a lot of Mississippi blues and Chicago blues. Jim likes Chicago and soul blues, and Fabio is happy to play drums on whatever we're doing."

The Rockin' Jukes, based in Salt Lake City, have been together as a group for three years, but as friends for longer. Barbosa says he and Tada, the guitar player, have known each other for at least 15 years. He's known Wheeler, a former Ogdenite who plays harmonica and slide guitar, for eight to 10 years. Derrickson, the bass player, is the newest member of the group.

"We do a lot of blues jams," said Barbosa. "We know each other because of that, and we have a lot in common."

Blues may be the common link, but each of the musicians has a different take on it.

"When you say 'blues,' a lot of people think it's one genre. 'There are at least 500 shades of the blues,' " Wheeler said, quoting poet and performer Gil Scott-Heron. "I believe there are 500 kinds of blues music, too."

The band starts each gig with a written play list, but they don't always stick with it.

"I would say that if we got to where maybe we could be pigeon-holed on one song, we would probably drop it," Wheeler said. "Part of the thing about playing the blues is that you're always growing, learning and improvising ... we're going to push each other to play the best we can."

Joe McQueen is a legend among Jazz enthusiasts and the Ogden crowd. Making his way through Ogden in 1945 he was stranded and has pretty much stuck around ever since. Unpretentious and honest in his musicmanship, Joe plays from the heart and strives to share his soul through the wail of his saxophone. 

Since his 1987 Grammy nomination for Best New Artist (Timbuk3), pat mAcdonald has continued to write, perform and reinvent himself releasing 7 critically acclaimed albums--5 with worldwide distribution. The evolution of his solo acoustic works such as Pat MacDonald Sleeps With His Guitar, Begging Her Graces, Degrees of Gone, and Strange Love: PM does DM led to his more amplified sound found on In the Red Room and Troubadour of Stomp which some describe as "Gothic Americana Swamp Rock Blues."

mAcdonald's latest release Purgatory Hill--recorded with partner melaniejane--features an amplified Lowebow cigar-box guitar. The Shepherd Express hails the record as "...nothing less than a shocking reinvention of blues and rock music..."

In addition to his solo career, mAcdonald has been a highly sought-after songwriting collaborator working with such artists as Stewart Copeland (of The Police), Imogen Heap, E (from the Eels), Oysterhead, Keith Urban, John Parish (P.J. Harvey, Eels, Sparklehorse), Ryuichi Sakamoto, Eric McFadden and Jackson Browne who describes mAcdonald as "...one of the great lyricists in the English language..." Artists from Aerosmith to Pavoratti have performed his songs.

Other endeavors include Steel Bridge SongFest, The Holiday Music Motel and a pending book deal...

pat mAcdonald and melaniejane team up to create dark, sexy, hypnotic low-end grooves. The two of them onstage have an arsenal of instruments - pat: guitar, cigarbox slide guitar, stompbox and harmonica; melaniejane: electric cello, keyboard, accordion and variety of hand percussion. These two carry the weight of a full band. Although comparisons as far reaching from The White Stripes, Morphine and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club to the recent Robert Plant/Alison Krauss collaboration would not be out of line, mAcdonald's song-writing sensibilities coupled with his stomp-board invention and modification of his instruments creates a sound which appeals to music-lovers of all genres yet has a unique stamp unto itself. The two tour regularly throughout the US.

melaniejane has performed throughout the U.S. and has appeared with or opened for such artists as Sam Llamas (The BoDeans), Victor DeLorenzo (Violent Femmes), The Silos (Bloodshot Records), Sigmund Snopek and Dick Parry (saxophonist from Pink Floyd) to name a few. Currently, she has two solo recordings — "Flower" and "Billets Doux," which showcase her talents as a singer, songwriter, instrumentalist and arranger.

Jessica Wilkes, vocalist of the popular band The Dirt Daubers, comes to the Ogden Roots & Blues Festival to perform with Mad Max & the Wild Ones

Mad Max & the Wild Ones is a rockin' family band from Springville, Utah. It all started when Wyatt asked for a guitar for his eighth birthday. Not too long after that Cole, at age 4, asked Santa for a drum set so he could play along with his brother. After a couple of years of lessons, the two were getting really good at figuring out songs together when they got Duke, at age 4, to start singing along. Duke also started guitar lessons and taught himself how to play harmonica. It wasn't long before the three of them had quite a few songs going down in the basement that they would play for anyone that happened to come over to the house! Max (Dad) started feeling a little left out, so Mom bought him an upright bass and Wyatt taught him how to play it. They started having so much fun playing music in the basement that that is how they were spending much of their time! A dear friend, car builder and customizer Bo Huff, of Bo Huff Customs, came over to the house and heard them play. He invited them to play at his yearly car show in Dragerton, Utah in 2006 and the rest is history! Since then they have performed all across the country and overseas!

Better Off With The Blues began life as an acoustic blues band with roots in Delta Blues, Country Blues, Folk Blues, Rags and Jug Band music. Members include Lou Borgenicht (harp and vocals), Ken Critchfield (bass), Jim Poulton (guitar and vocals), and Paul Rasmussen (guitar, mandolin and vocals). Playing music from such diverse artists as Mississippi John Hurt, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Muddy Waters, Blind Blake, Big Bill Broonzy, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, Mississippi Fred McDowell and more, BOWB performances feature a tour of the roots of the blues from the earliest decades of the 20th century. Add in songs by more current composers (including Delbert McClinton, Bob Dylan and members of BOWB themselves), and BOWB becomes a compendium for an entire century of blues approaches and styles.

A musical force equipped with the soulful vocals of Janis and the guitar slinging skills of Stevie Ray, Carolyn Wonderland reaches into the depths of the Texas blues tradition with the wit of a poet. She hits the stage with unmatched presence, a true legend in her time.

 

"One of the most impressively powerful voices recently heard anywhere, regardless of sex. Able to boon, cajole, promise and growl with equal power, she plays guitar with much the same forcefulness!" -Matt Weitz, Dallas Observer

"Carolyn Wonderland is the real deal! She's an amazing guitar player. She whistled a solo. She even played the trumpet! And damn, can she sing." - Los Angeles Times

Corey Harris is a guitarist, vocalist, songwriter and band leader who has carved out his own niche in blues. A powerful singer and accomplished guitarist, he has appeared at venues throughout the North America, Europe, Brazil, The Caribbean, West Africa, Asia, Australia and New Zealand. He began his career as a New Orleans street singer, travelling throughout the southern U.S. In his early twenties he lived in Cameroon, West Africa for a year, which had a profound effect on his later work. He has recorded many old songs of the blues tradition while also creating an original vision of the blues by adding influences from reggae, soul, rock and West African music. Some of his imaginative compositions are marked by a deliberate eclecticism; other works stay true to the traditional blues formula of compelling vocals and down-home guitar. With one foot in tradition and the other in contemporary experimentation, Harris is a truly unique voice in contemporary music. He has performed, recorded, and toured with many of the top names in music such as BB King, Taj Mahal, Buddy Guy, Henry Butler, R.L.Burnside, John Jackson, Ali Farka Toure, Dave Mattews Band, Tracy Chapman, Olu Dara, Wilco, Natalie Merchant, and others.

Marley's Ghost is nothing less than a national treasure, the capable inheritors of the archetypal Americana blueprint drawn up by The Band. As the L.A. Weekly aptly put it, "This West Coast [group] deftly, and frequently daffily, dashes across decades of American music to create a sound that's steeped in tradition but never bogged down by traditionalism." These guys can sing and play anything with spot-on feel, from reggae (hence the double-entendre moniker) to blues to stone country, which is what they've been doing - to the ongoing delight of a fervent cult that includes many of their fellow musicians - throughout their first quarter century as a working unit.

"The band has always been eclectic, and that's one of the reasons we've stayed together for this long," Wheetman explains. "I've said this before, but instead of having to be in a Delta blues band, an a cappella singing group, a country band, a reggae band, and being a singer/songwriter, I'm in one band and we just do all that. It's very convenient."

Dan Wheetman (vocals, bass, rhythm guitar, fiddle, harmonica, banjo, Dobro, lap steel) came to the group after a long career during which he played in the '60s Simi Valley, Calif., teen rock group the Humane Society, Fresh Air (with Don Heffington), the Honky Tonk Swamis and '70s country-rockers Liberty, who spent years on the road with John Denver and Steve Martin. Danny's showmanship and unique sense of humor, combined with an uncommonly powerful and resonant baritone, provide the focal point for the group's upbeat performances.

Mike Phelan (vocals, lead guitars, fiddle, Dobro, bass, lap steel), who's been performing as a singer/player since he was knee high to a grasshopper, has lived all over the U.S., playing, recording and performing in many styles, including bluegrass, rock, folk and blues in countless bands. Phelan cites guitarists Steve Cropper, Eldon Shamblin, Doc Watson, Jimi Hendrix and B. B. King, and vocalists Tommy Duncan, Ralph Stanley and William Bell as major influences. Like Wheetman and Wilcox, he's also a deft and prolific songwriter.

Jon Wilcox (vocals, mandolin, rhythm guitar, guitar, bouzouki) has solo recordings on the Folk-Legacy, Sierra-Briar and Sage Arts labels and has toured internationally as a singer/songwriter and interpreter of traditional American and British Isles music. He's also intimately familiar with the groves of academe, having graduated from Stanford Law School and later teaching high school history.

Ed Littlefield Jr. (vocals, pedal steel guitar, Highland bagpipes, keyboards, mandolin, Dobro, lead guitar), a product of the Northern California folk scene, relocated to Washington State in the early 1970s. He toured extensively with the well-known Seattle Western swing band Lance Romance before founding Sage Arts, one of the Northwest's premier recording studios, where he functions as a producer and engineer. Littlefield is one of the most innovative of the new breed of pedal steel guitarists; among his influences, he counts Ian & Sylvia, Bob Dylan, Flatt & Scruggs, Hank Williams, Doc Watson, Ernest Tubb, the Grateful Dead, The Band and the Rolling Stones.

Jerry Fletcher (keys, accordion, vocal arranging), who's long the band's secret weapon and unofficial fifth Ghost, appearing on albums and gigs from the outset, became a fulltime member in 2006. A teen rock rival of Wheetman's and later his cohort in Liberty, Fletcher lays down a thoughtful groove that grounds the band and completes the musical puzzle.

The original Songs of The Hollering Pines artfully present stories of long nights, short lives, and spilled chances. Sisters Kiki Jane Buehner and Marie Bradshaw build on the blood-tight harmonies of the past while Corinne Gentry's fiddle sweetens the sound. Drummer Dan Buehner sings as he lays down the back beat, and Dylan Schorer's electric and lap steel guitar embroidery rounds things out, puling The Hollering Pines closer to the dim lights and thick smoke of a neon roadhouse. Inspired by Lucinda Williams, Gillian Welch and Buddy Miller, Their brand of Americana draws on the strength of a tube driven radio signal, parting the sea of static, bouncing off of heaven and back to earth.

The Sweetwater Crossing Band has been playing together since December of 2010. Ranging in age from 14 to 17, these kids play a wide variety of bluegrass, old-timey music, even including songs from the top ten pop charts. The band features fiddles, guitar, mandolin, frailing banjo and bass, and has played at numerous church and community functions, major art and music festivals, delighting audiences with their youthful enthusiasm and stage presence.

Jeff Scroggins & Colorado is a high energy, high mountain "bluegrass explosion," that features the amazing banjo playing of Jeff Scroggins. Jeff's fiery style and lightning fast licks have earned him many fans worldwide, and have left many a first time listener in stunned disbelief! It also features the award winning mandolin playing of Jeff's son Tristan Scroggins. Tristan is also an accomplished songwriter, and his and Jeff's original instrumentals play a large role in the band's unique and energetic sound.

The band also features incredible bluegrass vocals, led by the powerful voice of frontman Greg Blake. Greg has twice been nominated for SPBGMA's "Traditional Male Vocalist of the Year" award, and his phenomenal bluegrass guitar playing has earned him 9 nominations and an amazing 5 consecutive wins as SPBGMA's Guitarist of the Year!

Annie Savage brings strong vocals and an aggressive fiddle style that is well suited to the band's high energy approach. She is a conservatory trained musician with 15 years teaching experience a great instructor as well as performer! KC Groves founded the all girl band Uncle Earl and is truly a force to be reckoned with! Having recorded with such greats as Charles Sawtelle and John Paul Jones of Led Zeppelin and touring internationally for many years, KC is an internationally renowned musician and song-writer. She teaches through Planet Bluegrass and is a fabulous addition to the project.

Bluegrass Rising are:

Richard Schmeling - Guitar, Mandolin, Vocals
Richard Schmeling originally hales from Brooklyn, New York, but has been playing bluegrass and other genres of music for many years in the Salt Lake valley. Along with guitar and mandolin, Richard is an accomplished piano player and loves performing the ballads of old time cowboy music and he loves the romance of the old west. Richard played guitar and mandolin with well-known Salt Lake band Ridin' the Fault Line for the past 18 years. He also played with Lonesome Ridge, filled in with the Backwoods Cowboy Band, and is currently a member of the Red Desert Ramblers, and the American Irish Duo.

Tim Morrison - Bass, Guitar, Vocals
Tim Morrison, originally from Salt Lake City, has been involved in the acoustic music community in Salt Lake for over 20 years. He is a former president of the Intermountain Acoustic Music Association, and president of Utah Friends of Bluegrass. He has also served as a co-director of the Utah State Instrument Championships and is currently in charge of judging. Tim formed Lonesome Ridge in the 90's and joined the Stormy Mountain Boys in the early 2000's and has played with them since. Tim has filled in with many bands across the intermountain west including Ridin' the Fault Line, the Red Desert Ramblers, and Hammer Down. Tim also played with the Backwoods Cowboy Band and played many old time cowboy variety shows around the Salt Lake valley. He also played and toured with national recording artist Ron Spears and Within Tradition.

Jake Workman - Banjo, Guitar, Mandolin, and Vocals
Jake Workman, from Draper, Utah, hit the bluegrass scene in Salt Lake when he was about 15 years old, when he joined Hammer Down as their banjo player. Since that time he earned his place as one of the most respected players in the bluegrass community, and has gone on to take 2nd place in the National Banjo Championships in 2010 and 2011. Jake started playing guitar at about age 17 and has since placed 4th in the National Flatpicking Championships at Winfield, Kansas. Jake has also won the Utah State Instrument Championships in guitar, banjo, and mandolin, and won the Texas State Guitar Championship in 2010. He has also won Guitar Center's King of the Blues competition nearly every year he competes. Jake also plays mandolin with intermountain favorite Cold Creek, and is the featured guitarist for Driven, a well-known bluegrass band from Kansas.

Rebekah Workman - Fiddle, Vocals
Rebekah Workman joined the bluegrass scene in Salt Lake when she met Jake Workman just a few years ago. She hales from Oak City, Utah. Rebekah and Jake would show up to the local bluegrass jams and while he was lighting it up on the guitar, Rebekah would light it up on the fiddle. Rebekah and Jake married and have been playing music together as a duo as well as in bluegrass bands and other settings. Rebekah's fiddle talent is the current driving force in Bluegrass Rising. She has also added her fiddle and voice to Hammer Down, Cold Creek, and Driven.

Blaine Nelson - Banjo
Blaine Nelson joins Bluegrass Rising as one of the finest 5 string banjo players in the state of Utah. His outstanding skills earned him the title of 2003 Utah State banjo champion. His unique and flawless banjo picking drive the sound of Cold Creek. He has played at numerous venues throughout Utah, both with his former band, Gift Horse, and as a solo act, including the 2002 Winter Olympics, the Founders Title Folk and Bluegrass Festival, and the Birch Creek Bluegrass Festival. 

Triggers and Slips music is steeped in the psychology of relationships. Like so much great country music that came before, theirs originates in personal mistakes and stepped on hearts. While the band's music is a blend that's not quite country and not quite rock n' roll, and not quite alt-country either, fans of both types of music have come to love their sound.

Triggers & Slips is based out of Salt Lake City, Utah. They have spent the last two years playing local venues and national music festivals. Lead by singer/songwriter Morgan Snow, he incorporates insightful, poignant lyrics, with a powerful, and soulful voice reminiscent of traditional country music like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, and Willie Nelson, while pulling from other influences such as Pink Floyd, The Who, Alice in Chains, Pearl Jam, Blind Melon, and Nirvana.

Triggers & Slips started in living rooms, and campfires for close friends, and the occasional new stranger. The music and performance has developed into something that is every bit as powerful in small intimate venues as it is at larger venues such as national music festivals with Snow playing solo, or as a duo with multi-instrumentalist John Davis, who adds lap steel, lead guitar, tenor guitar, as well as sharing the singing duties, which blend well with Snow's simple vocal and instrumental style.

Triggers & Slips also plays as a full 5 piece band that brings people to their feet with their blend of rock, honky tonk country, and psychedelia. Their ability to play to any crowd, and any venue, has provided them with opportunities to share their music to an eclectic group of people from events catered towards anything from EDM, jam bands, and country fans, to small coffee shops, and everything in-between.

“With one foot planted firmly in Appalachian music culture and the other always expanding and evolving, the Black Lillies have created a unique sound embraced by fans old and young.”

- Vanity Fair

Black Lillies front man Cruz Contreras knows a thing or two about the road.

After co-founding Robinella and the CCstringband with his wife, he spent nearly a decade traveling the road and making music from coast to coast. When his marriage – and the band – dissolved in 2007, he returned to the road ... this time, as the driver of a truck for a stone company. It was here, over a year spent rolling down the highways of East Tennessee, that the songs and sounds that would form the nexus of The Black Lillies were conceived.

And "Runaway Freeway Blues," the band's third studio album, was realized exactly there ... on the road. When the Lillies weren't playing their 200-odd gigs during 2012, they were in Wild Chorus Studio in their hometown of Knoxville, Tenn., working with Scott Minor of Sparklehorse to craft a beautiful ode to restless spirits and rambling hearts. Rooted in the mud-rutted switchbacks of Appalachia, "Runaway Freeway Blues" is the sound of a band that's becoming something of a phenomenon across the country.

Contreras and his bandmates – harmony vocalist Trisha Gene Brady, multi-instrumentalist Tom Pryor, bass player Robert Richards and drummer Bowman Townsend – have grown from a few friends sitting around campfires and living rooms to a band that shows up in far-flung cities where folks to whom they've never played before already know the words to the songs. Eschewing record labels, they've still managed to conquer the Billboard Top 200 charts (Runaway Freeway Blues debuted at #43), put three tracks in Country Music Television's top 12 requested videos, and film a nationally broadcast commercial for Twizzlers. They've been featured on numerous television specials and played festivals as widespread as Bonnaroo, Rochester Jazz Festival, MerleFest, and CMA Fan Fair. Despite trafficking in a richer, more authentic brand of country and Americana than what gets played on mainstream country radio, they've still been invited to perform at the Grand Ole Opry more than twenty times – a record for an independent act.

The Black Lillies, in other words, have come a long way from those early days, when Contreras channeled heartache and regret into a stunning debut. "Whiskey Angel" was the sound of a man drowning his sorrows, and an introduction to someone who had languished behind the scenes for too long. As the guy who loaned out his initials to Robinella and the CCstringband, which flirted with national fame a few years ago with a hit ("Man Over") on Country Music Television, an appearance on "Late Night With Conan O'Brien" in 2003, and albums on both Sony and Dualtone, he was known best as a mandolin virtuoso and bandleader.

Starting over, he stunned friends and peers in the East Tennessee music scene with a voice that makes you think of Randy Travis or Dan Tyminski or even the great Ralph Stanley in his prime: steeped in regret, seasoned with pain and tempered in the fires of hard times. It served "Whiskey Angel" well, and when "100 Miles of Wreckage" was released in 2011, the band seemingly burst onto the national stage – spending five solid months in the Americana Music Association's radio charts (four of them in the top 15).

That record was the sound of a man taking stock of his life and his past, regarding the pain and the turmoil with a measure of wistful acceptance. Which brings us to "Runaway Freeway Blues," which finds the band focused on the horizon, filled with the nervous energy of excitement at the unknown future waiting on the other side of that distant hill, enthusiastic about the journey as much as they are about the destination.

The emotional arc of the new record is brilliant, so vivid and detailed with lush harmonies and instrumental virtuosity that's as powerful in the quieter moments as it is explosive during jubilant ones. You can cherry-pick any number of songs from "Runaway Freeway Blues" and find gold. Banjo, pedal steel, piano and everything else lift this record up on wings of uncommon grace and stunning vitality, and when Contreras and Brady combine their voices, it calls to mind classic duets from times long gone: George and Tammy. Gram and Emmylou. Johnny and June. From gentle Laurel Canyon folk rock to the honky-tonk heartache of classic country to winding jams, "Runaway Freeway Blues" is an album that defies easy categorization.

It was conceived on the road, inspired by the road and completed there as well: Contreras mixed the album while on tour, by phone and email, coordinating overdubs and guest instrumental appearances (Josh Oliver, formerly of the everybodyfields; banjo player Matt Menefee, who's toured with Mumford & Sons, Levi Lowery and Big & Rich; and a host of Tennessee's finest musicians on horns, harmonica and percussion) while playing into the wee hours of the morning, driving all night and setting up in the next city to do it all over again.

It's breakneck, brazen and beautiful. It's the sound of a band that's rooted in East Tennessee but more at home piled into a van stacked with gear, windows down and aimed toward the next gig. It's an album that lets long-time fans as well as relative newcomers to the Black Lillies phenomenon know that this train isn't stopping anytime soon.

"Shook Twins' performances feel like a glimpse into a long history of musical discovery—their shows can feel like late-night porch sessions, where the songs are so internalized they stream out like a conversation." – Emilee Booher, Willamette Week

Born and raised in Sandpoint Idaho, Shook Twins are an Indie folk-pop band now hailing from coniferous forested Portland, Oregon. Identical twins, Katelyn and Laurie Shook, Kyle Volkman and Niko Daoussis form the core quartet. Central elements of the Shook Twins' sound are a wide range of instrumentation, including banjo, guitar, electric and upright bass, mandolin, electric guitar, electronic drums, face drum (beatbox), glockenspiel, ukulele, banjo drumming and their signature golden EGG. Beautiful twin harmonies, layered upon acoustic and electric instrumentation coupled with Laurie's inventive use of percussive and ambient vocal loops, and Katelyn's repurposed telephone microphone, set their sound apart, creating a unique and eccentric blend of folk, roots, groove and soul.

The twins are the main songwriters but they have recently started backing up their band members, Niko Daoussis (Cyber Camel) and Anna Tivel (Anna and the Underbelly) and adding their stunning songs to the mix.

Each Shook Twins song tells a story, distinctive, sharp, genuine, and well – sometimes quirky. Drawing from their life experience, select subjects include, being potters' daughters, imagined superpowers and a chicken named 'Rose' they befriended. Shook Twins also pull out unexpected takes on classic hits, retellings of their musician friends' songs, heartfelt ballads and rhythm driven dance numbers.

It can be argued that it was Booker T. Jones who set the cast for modern soul music and is largely responsible for its rise and enduring popularity. On classic Stax hits like "Green Onions," "Hang 'Em High," "Time Is Tight," and "Melting Pot" the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, Musicians Hall of Fame inductee and GRAMMY Lifetime Achievement Award recipient pushed the music's boundaries, refined it to its essence and then injected it into the nation's bloodstream. In June of 2013, Sound the Alarm, the new album from Booker T, finds the Hammond B3 organ master looking ahead yet again, laying down his distinctive bedrock grooves amid a succession of sparkling collaborations with some of contemporary R&B's most gifted young voices.

Back for a second time to the OFOAM Stage, both at the festival and our free outreach event at the Downtown Ogden Amphiteater on Thursday, August 21, that mad man on the accordion, Jeffery Broussard!

One of the most influential accordianists and vocalists in modern Zydeco music, Jeffery Broussard continues to be one of the genre's most dynamic performers. He has continually been an innovator, beginning his career with traditional Creole Zydeco music playing drums in his father's band, Delton Broussard & the Lawtell Playboys, then moving on to develop the nouveau Zydeco sound in Zydeco Force, now returning to the more traditional Zydeco sound with his own band, Jeffery Broussard and the Creole Cowboys.

 

The dynamic bluegrass quintet from Springfield, MO with their high-octane shows, tight harmonies and stunning instrumental prowess, have been winning fans and making waves at every festival they have been invited, and consequently re-invited to since their formation in 2008. Recently signed to Nashville-based roots music company the Compass Records Group, the HillBenders will release their new album Can You Hear Me? on September 25th, presenting an intensely charismatic album imbued with the spirit and energy of their live shows. "Our music appeals to anyone that can enjoy a fun performance. We share a passion for the music, a passion to perform," says guitarist Jim Rea, "It's evident we have fun on stage. People come up to us and say sarcastically, 'liven up!'"

Thus the challenge in recording Can You Hear Me?" was clear — the band had to capture their undeniable live appeal on the twelve tracks, eight of which are originals. Lead singer and mandolinist Nolan Lawrence with Jim Rea and his cousin Gary Rea on guitar and bass respectively, banjoist Mark Cassidy and Dobroist Chad "Gravy Boat" Graves channeled the rawness and intensity of bands like Newgrass Revival into the carefully executed arrangements. They worked closely with roots music engineer and producer Bil VornDick for an album that aligned their diverse tastes and styles while showcasing the collective talent of each band member, including a grassified cover of the Romantics' "Talking in Your Sleep" and Hal Ketchum's country hit, "Past the Point of Rescue," which includes a samba-grass breakdown after the second chorus.

The album-opening "Train Whistle," is a rambling train song, a staple to the bluegrass band, though the band hesitates the genre distinction. "Bluegrass is where we found our voice as performers, so we feel like we owe a lot to it. We have one foot in bluegrass all the time while the other is reaching out and exploring our interests in rock and roll, jazz, funk and Americana," says Chad. By winning the Telluride Bluegrass Band Competition in 2009 and the National Single Microphone Championship the following year, the band became favorites on the bluegrass festival scene with their own brand of acoustic fusion. "A lot of people, even at the more traditional festivals, tell us 'You guys are so fun to listen to!' This comes from the die-hard traditionalists. They are saying that it is really refreshing to see something new. At the same time we're not afraid to be looked down upon – all of that formality melts away when we just be ourselves."

The HillBenders recognize their ability to bridge the gap between the common music consumer and the bluegrass genre, selecting material for the album that defies any hillbilly stigmas. Nolan comments, "With our widely varied influences, we're all trying to bring in songs that unify. We wanted to pair bluegrass with the other American music we grew up with —rock and roll!" Their festival appearances also reflect the crossover; the band recently played the very traditional Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival and the esteemed Philadelphia Folk Festival on back to bay days on the same weekend.

Still, the heart of the new album draws from the band's live performances. Nolan adds, "If the music isn't played with intensity, you can tell. You have to play the music with that passion or it just isn't going to sound right." Can You Hear Me? is an album that showcases a young band with ambition and talent at a volume that comes across loud and clear.

The Steel Wheels are renowned for their raw energy and chemistry on stage, where they cluster tightly around a single microphone to adorn Trent Wagler's unmistakable tenor with bell-clear four part harmonies complimented by Eric Brubaker's fiddle, Brian Dickel's upright bass and Jay Lapp on the mandolin and guitars. The band’s own brand of acoustic Americana roots music reflects stylings of the past yet boldly embodies the strength of powerful original song writing.

The Steel Wheels are selling out venues from coast to coast and appearing at many of the top festivals in the US & Canada.  These include Merlefest, Grey Fox, Bristol Rhythm & Roots, Ann Arbor Folk Festival, Stagecoach, Fayetteville Roots Festival, Moab Folk Festival, Musikfest, Walnut Valley Festival, Canmore Folk Festival, Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival, Kerrville Folk Festival, and many others. 2014 shows no signs of slowing down with a full schedule of prestigious festivals and venues.  In July the band hosts their own annual Red Wing Roots Music Festival bringing over 40 bands to 4 stages for 3 days of music & community.  In addition as the schedule allows, the band organizes and performs the SpokeSongs bicycle music tour, during which the band members tow their instruments, equipment and merchandise from one show to another via bicycle.  Past tours have spanned up to 11 days, 600 miles, and 10 shows.  The attention from these special SpokeSongs tours allow the band to raise extra money and awareness for charities and causes along the way.

Alejandro Escovedo's family tree includes former Santana percussionist Pete Escovedo and Pete's daughter Sheila E (also Prince's former drummer and later a pop star). He began his music career with the Nuns, a mid-'70s punk band based in San Francisco. He co-founded the pioneering cowpunk band Rank and File in 1979, which moved to Austin, Texas in 1981 after a stint in New York City. The band released Sundown on Slash Records in 1982, but shortly after, Escovedo left to form the True Believers with brother Javier. The band recorded two albums for EMI and toured the country, often as an opening act for Los Lobos. However, EMI opted not to release the second album, which eventually led to the group's breakup. (It eventually surfaced as a bonus item when Rykodisc reissued the first set on CD in 1994.) Escovedo released a solo album in 1992 on Watermelon Records, Gravity, uniting his wide variety of styles; the album was produced by Stephen Bruton of Bonnie Raitt's band. Escovedo also began gigging periodically with the band Buick MacKane, which fused old-school punk with '70s glam rock; after Rykodisc released Escovedo's With These Hands in 1996, they followed it up with Buick MacKane's long-awaited album. After Escovedo parted ways with Rykodisc, he signed in 1998 with the Chicago-based alt-country label Bloodshot, which released the live album More Miles Than Money: Live 1994-1996 and the acclaimed studio set A Man Under the Influence. In April 2003, Escovedo collapsed following a show in Phoenix, AZ, after which it was subsequently revealed that he had been diagnosed with Hepatitis C in the late '90s but had not sought treatment. An outpouring of support from musicians led to a series of successful benefit concerts to help pay Escovedo's medical expenses and keep his music before the public, followed by a tribute album, Por Vida: A Tribute to the Songs of Alejandro Escovedo, which was released in 2004. In 2006, Escovedo released Boxing Mirror and toured with the Alejandro Escovedo String Quintet to promote the album. His next album, Real Animal, was produced by Tony Visconti and released in June 2008. Escovedo re-teamed with Visconti for 2010's Street Songs of Love. Visconti also produced his follow-up, Big Station, which was released in the early summer of 2012.

In a relatively short period of time, Della Mae has become a sensation in the music world. Commanding a powerful collective chemistry with vocal, instrumental, and songwriting talent to spare, the Boston-based combo mines time-honored elements to create music that's unmistakably fresh and contemporary and has earned them the 2013 IBMA Emerging Artists of the Year

The group quickly won an enthusiastic following through their high-energy live performances at festivals around the country. The band expanded its reputation with their self-released first album, 2011's I Built This Heart, which won an impressive amount of attention for a D.I.Y. release.

This World Oft Can Be, Della Mae's second album and Rounder debut, shows that like the Avett Brothers, Lumineers, and Punch Brothers, these five multitalented young women are respectful of American musical tradition, but not restricted by it, combining centuries' worth of musical influences with an emotionally tough, undeniably modern songwriting sensibility.

In addition to playing festivals and clubs throughout the United States, Della Mae recently expanded the scale of its touring efforts after participating in the U.S. State Department's American Music Abroad program. Selected as cultural ambassadors, the band spent 43 days traveling in Pakistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, where they collaborated with local musicians, taught educational programs for children, and played concerts for local audiences.

"It's been a life-changing experience for us, individually and as a band," Ludiker says of the tour. "A cool thing about playing music in Central Asian countries is in the lack of distinction their audience places between musical genres. We found that if music is played with feeling, all people connected to it. They find themselves smiling and relating without even understanding the language."

Indeed, Della Mae demonstrates how effectively music builds bridges and transcends artificially constructed borders, whether they're national or genre-based. Ludiker concludes: "All five ladies are individually driven, and we are working towards the same goal. This band definitely feels like a calling, a labor of love."

"Canada's premier neo-tradsters romp from world-beat to blues, urban-pop to old-timey, with wild-eyed invention, haunting traditionalism, and spine-rattling groove." (Scott Alarik, The Boston Globe) GRAMMY nominees and JUNO award winners, seeing The Duhks live is nothing short of a spiritual experience. A syncopated bluesy banjo number seamlessly follows a Brazilian samba; an old-time jaunt nestles comfortably next to a gospel performance. One of the most musically adventurous bands to come from the roots scene in the past decade, The Duhks return to the stage is definitely a cause for celebration.

Joe McQueen is a legend among Jazz enthusiasts and the Ogden crowd. Making his way through Ogden in 1945 he was stranded and has pretty much stuck around ever since. Unpretentious and honest in his musicmanship, Joe plays from the heart and strives to share his soul through the wail of his saxophone. 

During his life, McQueen has performed in Ogden with jazz luminaries such as Charlie Parker, Chet Baker, Paul Gonsalves, Lester Young, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, and others. McQueen has toured as a musician in the Rocky Mountain West. He played in 1962 in Idaho Falls, Idaho with Hoagy Carmichael.

During his early years in Ogden, McQueen worked and played at the Porters and Waiters Club in Ogden. This was one of the few venues open to black Americans at the time. McQueen was the first African-American in Utah to play at previously white-only establishments and to have a mixed-race band.

At the age of 94, McQueen continues to perform live in clubs from Ogden to Salt Lake, record, and was recently the subject of a documentary film: "King of O-Town."

The dynamic bluegrass quintet from Springfield, MO with their high-octane shows, tight harmonies and stunning instrumental prowess, have been winning fans and making waves at every festival they have been invited, and consequently re-invited to since their formation in 2008. Recently signed to Nashville-based roots music company the Compass Records Group, the HillBenders will release their new album Can You Hear Me? on September 25th, presenting an intensely charismatic album imbued with the spirit and energy of their live shows. "Our music appeals to anyone that can enjoy a fun performance. We share a passion for the music, a passion to perform," says guitarist Jim Rea, "It's evident we have fun on stage. People come up to us and say sarcastically, 'liven up!'"

Thus the challenge in recording Can You Hear Me?" was clear — the band had to capture their undeniable live appeal on the twelve tracks, eight of which are originals. Lead singer and mandolinist Nolan Lawrence with Jim Rea and his cousin Gary Rea on guitar and bass respectively, banjoist Mark Cassidy and Dobroist Chad "Gravy Boat" Graves channeled the rawness and intensity of bands like Newgrass Revival into the carefully executed arrangements. They worked closely with roots music engineer and producer Bil VornDick for an album that aligned their diverse tastes and styles while showcasing the collective talent of each band member, including a grassified cover of the Romantics' "Talking in Your Sleep" and Hal Ketchum's country hit, "Past the Point of Rescue," which includes a samba-grass breakdown after the second chorus.

The album-opening "Train Whistle," is a rambling train song, a staple to the bluegrass band, though the band hesitates the genre distinction. "Bluegrass is where we found our voice as performers, so we feel like we owe a lot to it. We have one foot in bluegrass all the time while the other is reaching out and exploring our interests in rock and roll, jazz, funk and Americana," says Chad. By winning the Telluride Bluegrass Band Competition in 2009 and the National Single Microphone Championship the following year, the band became favorites on the bluegrass festival scene with their own brand of acoustic fusion. "A lot of people, even at the more traditional festivals, tell us 'You guys are so fun to listen to!' This comes from the die-hard traditionalists. They are saying that it is really refreshing to see something new. At the same time we're not afraid to be looked down upon – all of that formality melts away when we just be ourselves."

The HillBenders recognize their ability to bridge the gap between the common music consumer and the bluegrass genre, selecting material for the album that defies any hillbilly stigmas. Nolan comments, "With our widely varied influences, we're all trying to bring in songs that unify. We wanted to pair bluegrass with the other American music we grew up with —rock and roll!" Their festival appearances also reflect the crossover; the band recently played the very traditional Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival and the esteemed Philadelphia Folk Festival on back to bay days on the same weekend.

Still, the heart of the new album draws from the band's live performances. Nolan adds, "If the music isn't played with intensity, you can tell. You have to play the music with that passion or it just isn't going to sound right." Can You Hear Me? is an album that showcases a young band with ambition and talent at a volume that comes across loud and clear.

No strangers to the OFOAM stage, The Sister Wives will kick off the first annual Ogden Roots and Blues Festival in style!

Ranging from soulful blues to fiery rock to all-out dance band, the Sister Wives defy the conventional norms typically set for all-women bands with the range and depth of their musical energy and virtuosity.

The Sister Wives display a multitude of musical attitudes in a style that is part Stevie Ray Vaughn, a little Sippie Wallace, and a little Allman Brothers.

Their live shows persuade even the most skeptical that "Girls Rock!".

Each year the Ogden Music Festival provides exciting opportunities for experienced as well as aspiring musicians to learn from our perfomers.

 

 Workshops, a tradition since the first OFOAM Festival, provide an intimate environment to get a closer look at the main-stage performers, their instruments and techniques.  Learn from the unique collaborations of festival artists about band dynamics for all ages, instrument playing, songwriting, vocals or just see and hear more of your favorite band. 

This year the workshops will be held at the Trader Bowery, near the restrooms and playground. Sound provided by Danny Stark.

 

The Atomics dripping wet reverb will drench you with their vintage sounds and retro bombshell vibes! With three sisters and a brother, Starlie, Daisy, Pyper & Lucky will make you fall in love with surf music all over again!

"Korene Greenwood, bassist and singer, has become something of a fixture on the Ogden music scene. She has played with a number of outfits, including fronting her own band, The Great Danes.

The titian-haired musician first started out at age 16, playing country at a college hangout in her birthplace of Provo. She took it up because, after seeing "Coal Miner's Daughter," she aspired to be Loretta Lynn.

Though she started out in stone country, one of Greenwood's strengths, then and now, is that she can handle pretty much any style. She does everything from classic rock to traditional country with The Great Danes, and at times they welcome Rockabilly Hall of Famer Hal "Holiday" Schneider, of Ogden, onstage to sing a few uptempo R&B and rock 'n' roll gems.

Greenwood also plays in the roots rocking blues trio The Bastard Redheads with fellow Ogden musician Dan Weldon (as well as with Salt Lake City's B.B. Mendelson), and also can call herself an honorary Kap Brother, since she sometimes sits bass for that outfit and for other musicians who have spun off the Kaps' Ogden music collective.

Though she based out of Provo, Greenwood played music throughout the West as a young woman. Through her booking agent in the '80s, she met the gents who [became] The Great Danes -- Danish brothers Lynn and John Smith. They were known then [and now, again] as The Horse Brothers....

Even though Greenwood moved to Roy about 17 years ago, she didn't know the players in the Ogden music scene until about 12 years ago, because she continued to perform with Salt Lake City-based bands. It was in that time frame she started attending the jams at Beatnik's (now part of Brewski's on Ogden's Historic 25th Street).

Brad Wheeler, a musician and afternoon radio personality on KRCL 90.9 FM, was then the manager of the nightclub, and made some key introductions for Greenwood. There, she made fast friends and became musical partners with Dan Weldon, who hosted the jam session for a time. She also was introduced to the Kaps, as well as Schneider and others she plays with, such as singer/songwriter/guitarist Scotty Haze and blues singer Kristi DeVries.

There is one Ogden musician Greenwood met that she has yet to work with, and she still holds out hope of it happening.

"I would really still like to jam with Joe McQueen," she said of the Ogden saxophone legend. "I like him because he can play all the old classic stuff. And I just love that stuff." Linda East Brady, Ogden Standard-Examiner

John Mooneyis an American blues guitarist and singer based in New Orleans Louisiana. He has developed a unique music style by combining Delta blues with the funky second line beat of New Orleans. As a guitarist, he is especially known for his slide guitar work.

What is Progressive PsychoBilly Folk Grass? It’s a goat chewing on a can, it’s a cat scratching at your door, it’s foot stompin’ music that makes you want to eat a biscuit. Melodies you wake up humming in the morning, that stick to your bones like peach cobbler. It’s new-timey, post-retro, pre-apocolyptic, southern Appalachian, gypsy porch swing. It’s Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats. Enjoy Jonathan Warren - Vocals, Guitar, Upright bass; David Sather-Smith - Vocals, Cello, Guitar; Andrew Smith - Percusion

Bill "Watermelon Slim" Homans has built a remarkable reputation with his raw, impassioned intensity.

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